The Best 8K TVs You Can Buy Right Now: From $3,000 To $30,000

Credit: Bretwa / Wiki Commons

With any new(ish) technology, finding the right option is tough. However, the leap from 4K to 8K isn’t as mind-blowing as the jump from HD to 4K:

This is because technologies such as HDR, Dolby Vision, et al., remain relevant on 8K. So when looking for the best 8K TVs the challenge is making sure the screen packs a punch.

The following TVs deliver amazing picture quality along with all the other features you would expect from such expensive tech.

CHECK OUT: The Best Budget 4k Smart TV With Roku Built-In

Samsung 75″ Class Neo QLED QN900A Series, $6,999

Best 8K TVs
(Photo: Amazon.com)

The Samsung Class Neo QLED QN900A Series operates on Neo QLED technology:

A technology that uses LEDs that are 1/40th the size of a regular Light Emitting Diode, which means more detailed dimming zones and black fields.

This technology also delivers better colors, brightness, and fidelity than normal QLED TVs.

Inside the TV there is also an AI-based Neo Quantum Processor 8K, ensuring it can handle any smart-TV task you can throw at it.

The TV’s MSRP is $6,999 on Amazon.com, but you can pick it up on sale for below $6,000.

Sony ZH8/Z8H, $3,999

This model comes with Tri-Luminous LED screen technology.

A technology that replaces white lights in the standard LED backlight. Instead, it uses a pure blue light and mixes it with red and green to create a brighter and more variable white on-screen.

The TV includes a built-in sound system, Chromecast functionality, and at one point, the most powerful processor ever to be used in a TV.

This TV is available on Amazon.com for under $4,000.

CHECK OUT: The Best 80 Inch 4k TV For Under $2,000

Sony ZH9 Master Series, $4,499

When you call a model “Master Series”, you know the manufacturer can pull no punches.

It comes with Sony’s most advanced upscaling and motion handling technology, giving pictures a crystal clear clarity regardless of source:

The ZH9 includes automatic brightness modulation which adapts the screen to its surroundings and X-wide angle technology that makes pictures and colors great from any angle.

It includes a great processor for smart TV features and works with devices such as Google Home, Alexa, and many more.

The TV’s MSRP is $4,499.99, but it is available on Amazon.com for under $3,100.

LG 75″ Class NanoCell 99 Series, $2,999

This LG 8k TV comes with a host of interesting features for the price. For instance, LG’s WebOS aims to deliver content to your TV without cables and AI picture processing that reduces eye strain.

The TV includes a low latency mode for responsive gaming and full array lighting, which provides great local dimming and contrast ratios, improving the quality of HDR content.

Check out the TV on LG.com now for more information.

CHECK OUT: The 5 Best 65-inch 4k Smart TVs For Under-$1000 Right Now

Sony 85″ Class Z8H Master Series, $4,999

Amazingly, you can find this 8K TV for under $4,000 if you shop around:

And at that price point, it is one of the best budget 8K TVs available.

This Sony 8K TV gives 2,500 nits, delivering unbelievable brightness across its huge display. And when combined with local dimming and a full array LED, blacks are blacker too.

The TV supports Dolby Vision, HDR10, HLG, and many of the latest TV audiovisual standards.

Check out the TV on Sony.com now for more information.

LG 88″ Class OLED Signature ZX, $29,999

Yes, you did read that price right. It costs almost $30,000!

Yet, if you have deep pockets, this LG 8K TV delivers an enormous 88-inch screen, crystal clear clarity, the best contrast ratio possible, and every imaginable feature:

For instance, this TV adjusts to the light in the room, supports the fastest gaming response times, including FreeSync and GSync. Not to mention, supports Dolby Vision-IQ, Dolby Atmos, hands-free voice control, and so much more.

Check out the TV on LG.com now for more information.

CHECK OUT: 10 Most Expensive TVs In The World: From $111,000 To $2.3 Million


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